04 APRIL TIMES IN LONGLAC

The markings on the machine read “HICKS SUTTON SNOWPLANE”, not dated, not sourced. Dr. N.H. Sutton had a practice in Beardmore, and apparently he and Mel Hicks ran a transportation business. This scene may show the road (not plowed in winter) between Beardmore and the Leitch gold mine. It is interesting to see a non-mechanized alternative to winter travel.

04 Reports in the Port Arthur News-Chronicle in 1937

Refer to introductory remarks in post 01 January Times in Longlac.

Mon Apr 5Misses Eileen Gervis and Theresa Caouette who spent their Easter holidays here, left on Sunday for Parry Sound. / Jack Harvey of Orillia, returned to his home on Saturday after spending his Easter holidays with Mr. and Mrs. R.R. Davis. / Miss Lillian Thrasher of Port Arthur spent a few days in Long Lac with Mrs. D. Budd. / George Taylor returned home from a holiday in Fort William on Sunday. / William Tough spent the week-end in Tashota on business. / Frank Rupert of Hornepayne spent the week-end in Long Lac as relieving operator. / Miss Velma Boisseneau and Edith Taylor were recent visitors to Geraldton. / Mrs. G. Reesor and daughter Suzetta, returned home from Sault Ste. Marie on Friday. / George Gibson of Geraldton spent the week-end in Long Lac with George Reesor. / Miss Edna Swallowel returned from a holiday in Fort William Thursday. / Mrs. S.A. Taylor arrived from Fort William on Saturday, after spending the past week with friends.

Wed Apr 14S.A. Taylor of Long Lac, accompanied by M. Cowan, Mr. Cooper and Mr. Glass, all of Winnipeg, spent a few days in Beardmore on business. / Miss Marjorie Trimble, of Long Lac, was a visitor in Geraldton on Friday. / Leslie A. Martin spent Friday in the Geraldton vicinity. / Miss Anne Allan, of Little Long Lac Gold Mines, spent a week in Long Lac with her relatives. / John A. Taylor, of Long Lac, was a recent visitor to Geraldton. / Jeff Gauthier formerly of Nakina, now at Geraldton, spent Sunday in town with his parents. / Misses Edith and Mildred Taylor, spent Friday in Geraldton, getting dental work attended to. / V.S. Strathan of Hornepayne, spent the week-end in Long Lac as a swing operator. / Rev. W. Bradbury of Hornepayne, held an Anglican Church service in the public school on Monday. / Mr. and Mrs. E. Kangas of Longmuir, spent Sunday in Long Lac with Mr. and Mrs. W. Allan. / William Lloyd, of Long Lac, was a visitor in Tashota on Saturday. / Mrs. John Heald, of Long Lac, left on a two-months vacation in Port Arthur on Wednesday. / Miss Norma Alto, returned from Hornepayne on Sunday, after spending a few days with her sister, Irma. / Mrs. J. Boisseneau is spending a few days in Hillsport with Mrs. E. Ward. / D. Agnessi and daughter Carmen, were visitors in Long Lac on Sunday. / Charles Johnson and son Albert spent Saturday in Geraldton with J. Raunio. / Walter Jolly, was has been in Long Lac the past month, left on Friday for Winnipeg, to visit his brother, before leaving for Vancouver. / Ed. Joanis, of Long Lac, left for Port Arthur on Friday to spend a few days on business. / BUILDING PROGRAM A building program is now getting under way, with R. Gauthier, general merchant, and T.J. Gaffney, proprietor of the Long Lac Hotel, building additions to their establishments. / Mr. Gauthier is planning on having ten rooms built on top of the store, work is now underway. Mr. Gaffney has built a new kitchen and intends to have booths in the dining room, and more rooms added. He is also remodelling his rooms in the inside.

Mon Apr 19PLANE ACCIDENT A plane owned by the Nipigon Airways and piloted by James Bell broke through the ice near its base here Friday afternoon. No one was injured. The lower wings and the propellor were badly damaged. The plane was taking off for a trip to Caramat, thirty miles east of here, to bring in the Sudbury diamond drill equipment. Before the accident the plane had made several trips and the ice appeared in good condition except for a few spots where there were air holes. The plane was lifted out of water and taken to shore. / Frank Rupert of Hornepayne was relieving operator, during the week-end. / Miss Irma Alto, of Hornepayne spent Sunday in Long Lac with her relatives. / W. Woodward of Port Arthur spent Thursday in Long Lac on business. / George Taylor, Jim Gareau, Jack Gemmell and Alphonse Beaulieu were recent visitors to Geraldton. / Misses Ottie Wright, Lorna Taylor and Cecile Gauthier spent Sunday in Geraldton with friends. / Jeff Gauthier of Geraldton spent Sunday in Long Lac with his parents. / Misses Irene and Anna Hebert of Longlac spent Friday in Geraldton. / James Bell was a business visitor in Geraldton on Friday. / Mr. and Mrs. Storry [?] left on Thursday for Port Arthur. / Constable Nelson of Long Lac left on Thursday for Toronto to spend a few days before leaving for England. / Robert Bell of Geraldton , spent Sunday in Long Lac with G. Reesor. / B. Martinson of Long Lac spent Saturday in Geraldton on business. / Mrs. Maud Gascon returned from Toronto, on Friday after spending the past month in Toronto on business. / Roy Spooner of the Nipigon Airways at Jellicoe, spent Saturday in Long Lac on business.

Tue Apr 20SNOWMOBILE ACCIDENTS Two snowmobiles1 came to grief here in accidents Saturday and Sunday. / On Saturday morning, a machine operated by Roger Marleau went through the ice ten miles south of Long Lac, near McFarlane Gold Mines property. No damage resulted, and the machine was pulled out of the water the following day with the aid of two men and the other snowmobile. / On Sunday afternoon, a machine owned by Dr. Sutton and Mel Hicks and driven by Roger Marleau turned over while going at high speed. The driver escaped serious injury, but the propellor and the front of the snowmobile were damaged.

Tue Apr 20extract – TIMBER POLICIES (an editorial)

A deal between the Ontario government and a group of American pulpwood buyers2 provides a timber concession in the Long Lac area, but the deal has not been ratified yet. These same companies have been exporting wood to the U.S. which is harvested by local district companies.

The News-Chronicle suggests imposing a limited embargo (i.e., higher tariffs) to encourage American mills to establish here or to allow local mills to obtain higher prices.

“Considering that local [Port Arthur district] timber contractors who provide much employment and business for Port Arthur are called on to pay more than the price suggested [$1.00 per cord stumpage] for the Long Lac concession . . . , there will be few regrets if the deal does not go through.”

Wed Apr 21extract – NEW WATER DIVERSION (an editorial)

“The proposal to give an American syndicate pulpwood rights in the Long Lac area includes a plan to dam the outlet of Long Lac to force the water out by the southern end, North of Schreiber3 into the Black River which flows into Lake Superior, rather than by way of Burrows River [actually, Kenogami River] which flows North taking the water to Hudson Bay [actually, James Bay] . . . If it were diverted South it would constitute an addition to the Great Lakes reserves, not as large as the proposed Ogoki diversion4 but still worthwhile . . . The only thing necessary would be to cut a small channel through the height of land some twenty-five miles north of Schreiber . . . “

Black Siding, a passing track on the CPR in 1946. It is named for the Black River, and is the location of the future community of Terrace Bay. The name comes from a succession of shore lines as ancient Lake Superior shrank in size. Also in the vicinity is a CPR borrow pit called Black Pit which, for some reason, was passed over as a suitable name for the community. Photo Thunder Bay Public Library.
The control dam at the south end of Long Lake, not dated. Pulpwood is being sluiced through into the canal system. Photo Thunder Bay Public Library.

Thu Apr 22 – A passenger in the latest snowplane accident which occurred at Long Lac a few days ago said here the plane had attained a speed of between sixty and seventy miles an hour when it suddenly overturned. / The ice on the lake over which it was travelling, was quite soft, but despite that the plane slid for a distance of 125 feet, when it dropped through a hole. / The most damage to any passenger concerned himself the man said. In evidence he offered a leather boot which bore a long scratch in the leg.

Sat Apr 24MINE FIELD EXTENDS EAST PICTURE [not copied due to poor quality] shows Head Frame on J.[sic] A. Timmins property at Suicide River, about eight mines East of Long Lac. Hollinger is also sinking in the same vicinity.

Tue Apr 27CNR SERVICE For Port Arthur people travelling to the mining fields of the Long Lac area the train service out of this city on the C.N.R. is now practically perfect, in that it is possible to take a train here at night, arrive in the mining territory in the early morning, have all day to do business before entraining again in the evening for arrival home in the early morning with loss of only one day from business here. For residents of the mining field the service is much the same, it being possible for them to do their travelling at nights and have the intervening day in Port Arthur.

Thu Apr 29Lou Roberts, of Port Arthur, spent Thursday in Long Lac on business. / J.G. Geruis of Long Lac, spent the week-end in Parry Sound visiting relatives. / Miss Jean Gauthier and Betty McMahon, of Long Lac, spent Friday in Geraldton. / Miss Marjorie Trimble, teacher, of Long Lac, spent the week-end in the Twin Cities. / Leslie A. Martin, of the Hudson Bay staff, left on Friday for Kenora to visit his parents before leaving for Winnipeg. / Miss Anna Allan, of Little Long Lac Gold Mine, spent Sunday in Long Lac with her parents. / Roger Marleau, of Long Lac, spent Friday in Geraldton. / S.A. Taylor, of Long Lac, was a visitor to Geraldton recently. / Delard Hebert and Scotty McMaster returned from Black, Ont., on Sunday, after spending the past three months working for the Dept. of Lands. / Clement Nabigon left on Sunday for Jellicoe, where he has obtained employment. / Mrs. J. Boisseneau, left on Sunday for Port Arthur. / Doug Morrison and Archie Turner, were visitors to Geraldton on Thursday. / J. Mutree, of Fort William, spent Wednesday in Long Lac on business. / Mrs. E. Pontynen and daughter Helen, left on Sunday for Port Arthur to spend a few days with friends. / Dennis Bull and son Alfred returned from a visit in Espanola. / Mr. and Mrs. J. Stanek and daughter Eileen, spent Saturday in Geraldton. / George Reesor and R.R. Davis, spent Saturday in Geraldton. / Mrs. Charboneau and family, of Montreal, arrived in Long Lac on Sunday, where they will reside. / Joe Demoulin and Duncan Michano, spent Saturday in Geraldton. / Art Diggins, of Geraldton, was a recent visitor in Long Lac. / Rev. J. Couture, S.J., left on Sunday for Tashota, where he will spend a few days. / Wilmot MacFarlane, of MacFarlane Gold Mines, left on a trip of Saturday for Haileybery. / Robert Landrie, of Long Lac, is spending a few days in Geraldton on business. / Provincial Constable Harvey Blair, of Port Arthur, spent Thursday in Long Lac.

ENDNOTES

1 Nineteen-year-old Karl Lorch, a Saskatchewan resident, invented the snowplane in 1928 and perfected the prototype in 1931. It featured aircraft tubing for body and frame, three skis (one in front), and a propellor powered by a car engine. It became popular with winter travellers such as doctors, priests, police, and mail carriers. Some snowplanes were single-passenger models; others carried up to 4 people. Some people called the invention a snowmobile.

2 Pulpwood Supply Company (not named in the article) was the creature of four American pulpwood companies: Hammermill Paper Co., Meade Corp., Nekoosa-Edwards Co., and Kimberly-Clark Corp.

3 Schreiber was created during the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The canals between Long Lake and Lake Superior would incorporate a waterway called the Black River, some miles east of Schreiber. In 1946, Pulpwood Supply Co. began establishing a new community to service its new planned mill on the Black River. The community was called Terrace Bay, and at some point the Black River was renamed the Aguasabon. Pulpwood Supply changed its name to Longlac Pulp and Paper Co.

4 The Longlac Diversion was constructed from 1937 to 1939. In 1940, Ontario Hydro began another water diversion project. It channeled water southward from the Ogoki River, which discharged eastward into the Albany River. On the river, the Waboose Dam created a reservoir, and the Summit Dam controlled the flow southward through the Little Jackfish River, Lake Nipigon, and the Nipigon River. Three hydro-electric generating stations utilized the increased flow.

The Summit dam, the control dam for Ogoki Reservoir, releases water into the Little Jackfish River. Photo Peter Annin, author of The Great Lakes Water Wars, 2009.

PHOTOS

04a The markings on the machine read “HICKS SUTTON SNOWPLANE”, not dated, not sourced. Dr. N.H. Sutton had a practice in Beardmore, and apparently he and Mel Hicks ran a transportation business. This scene may show the road (not plowed in winter) between Beardmore and the Leitch gold mine.  It is interesting to see a non-mechanized alternative to winter travel.

04b Black Siding, a passing track on the CPR in 1946. It is named for the Black River, and is the location of the future community of Terrace Bay. The name comes from a succession of shore lines as ancient Lake Superior  shrank in size. Also in the vicinity is a CPR borrow pit called Black Pit which, for some reason, was passed over as a suitable name for the community. Photo Thunder Bay Public Library.

04c The control dam at the south end of Long Lake, not dated. Pulpwood is being sluiced through into the canal system. Photo Thunder Bay Public Library.

04d The Summit dam, the control dam for Ogoki Reservoir, releases water into the Little Jackfish River. Photo Peter Annin, author of The Great Lakes Water Wars, 2009.